M57 The Ring Nebula in Lyra

 

M57 The Ring Nebula in Lyra.

The nebula disk has an angular size of 1.5 × 1 arc-minutes, making it too small to be resolved with 10×50 binoculars, so it is best
viewed with a telescope and under some magnification. I find that 100x works well..

M57 is an example of the class of planetary nebulae known as bipolar nebulae.  The star at the Center is Blowing off its Outer atmosphere!

This will be the fate of our Sun in a few billion more years.

I processed this image to show structure in the nebula…
Taken from my backyard in Dayton, Ohio with my old C8 telescope & ZWO 174mm Monochrome Camera shot through RGB filters + Luminance channel,
16 minutes exposure total.

Best Regards,
John Chumack
www.galacticimages.com

 

Helix Nebula

“The Eye of God” Nebula – The Helix Nebula in Aquarius

The “Eye of God” a wide field shot!
The Helix Nebula, aka ” The Eye of God” also known as The Helix, or NGC 7293, is a large planetary nebula (PN) located in the constellation Aquarius.
Discovered by Karl Ludwig Harding, likely before 1824, this object is one of the closest to the Earth of all the bright planetary nebulae.
This is a dying star blowing off its outer atmosphere!
Based on recent measured expansion rates this Planetary Nebula is about 10,600 years old.
The central star is destined to become a white dwarf.
The estimated distance is about 215 parsecs (700 light-years). It is similar in appearance to the Cat’s Eye Nebula and the Ring Nebula, whose size,
age, and physical characteristics are similar to the Dumbbell Nebula, varying only in its relative proximity and the appearance from the equatorial
viewing angle.
Baader Modified Canon Rebel Xsi & 5.5 inch Newtonian Reflector, ISO 1600, for a 180 minute(3 hour)exposure, 45 x 4 minute subs.
Calibrated & Stacked in “Nebulosity”, Processed in Maxim DL & PS Camera Raw 2015..
it’s not too bad for a 5.5″ scope and sitting so low on the Horizon for us in Ohio.

Best Regards,
John Chumack
www.galacticimages.com