Tag Archives: Astrophotography

The Bubble Nebula, Caldwell 11, Sharpless 162

The Bubble Nebula Complex in Cassiopeia

NGC7635 The Bubble Nebula

Certainly my best shot of the Bubble Nebula complex to date!
Lots of detail in this one!
It is an enormous bubble being blown into space by a super-hot massive star!
This was a 10 Hours of exposure through Astronomik 7nm & 6nm Narrow Band data Mapped out to RGB. Captured over 3 nights from my backyard observatory in Dayton. 6″ Celestron Newt.,Coma Corrector, & ZWO 174mm Cooled CMOS Camera, Nebulosity, Pixinsight, & Adobe CS.
NGC 7635, also called the Bubble Nebula, Sharpless 162, or Caldwell 11, is a H II region emission nebula in the constellation Cassiopeia, The “bubble” is created by the stellar wind from a massive hot, 8.7th magnitude young central star, SAO 20575.
The Bubble is located in front of the HII Emission Region. It is located about 7000 to 11000 light years from Earth.

The Draco Galaxy Triplet,

Draco Galaxy Triplet!

The Draco Galaxy Triplet, 100 Million Light Years Away in the Constellation of Draco!
If you explore the wide field image you will see several other distant NGC & PGC galaxies.
The Draco Triplet from Top to bottom are NGC-5985 Seyfert type Face on Spiral Galaxy, NGC-5982 Elliptical Galaxy, & NGC-5981 Edge on Spiral Galaxy.
5.5 inch Newt. Scope & Modified Canon Rebel Xsi, ISO 1600, 24 x 5 minute subs stacked = 2 hour exposure total.

Captured at the Okie-Tex Star Party near Kenton, Oklahoma on 09-27-2016.

Best Regards,
John Chumack
www.galacticimages.com

Helix Nebula

“The Eye of God” Nebula – The Helix Nebula in Aquarius

The “Eye of God” a wide field shot!
The Helix Nebula, aka ” The Eye of God” also known as The Helix, or NGC 7293, is a large planetary nebula (PN) located in the constellation Aquarius.
Discovered by Karl Ludwig Harding, likely before 1824, this object is one of the closest to the Earth of all the bright planetary nebulae.
This is a dying star blowing off its outer atmosphere!
Based on recent measured expansion rates this Planetary Nebula is about 10,600 years old.
The central star is destined to become a white dwarf.
The estimated distance is about 215 parsecs (700 light-years). It is similar in appearance to the Cat’s Eye Nebula and the Ring Nebula, whose size,
age, and physical characteristics are similar to the Dumbbell Nebula, varying only in its relative proximity and the appearance from the equatorial
viewing angle.
Baader Modified Canon Rebel Xsi & 5.5 inch Newtonian Reflector, ISO 1600, for a 180 minute(3 hour)exposure, 45 x 4 minute subs.
Calibrated & Stacked in “Nebulosity”, Processed in Maxim DL & PS Camera Raw 2015..
it’s not too bad for a 5.5″ scope and sitting so low on the Horizon for us in Ohio.

Best Regards,
John Chumack
www.galacticimages.com

Planets & Galactic Center

The Planets Mars & Saturn Visit Antares & Dark Galactic Horse

Looking over the Top of Our Galactic Center, in this star studded field The Planets Mars & Saturn visit Antares & M4 Globular Cluster. Also Rho Ophiuchi Nebula region, & The Dark Galactic Horse, The Pipe Dark Nebula, M6, & M7 Open clusters, M19, M62 are in there too..just tiny…and many others DSO’s are barely visible too.

Canon 6D DSLR, 47 mm lens, ISO 3200, 2 x 2 minutes, only got 4 minutes total due to windy conditions on the beach,…but it show what I wanted and that was the Planets near Antares & Dark Horse. This was taken with my 24mm to105mm lens set at 47mm. Captured over Cape Cod, Ma. on 06-02-2016.
Best Regards,
John Chumack
www.galacticimages.com

Impact Craters Tycho & Clavius

COLO has been busy!!!
The Chumack Observatory Lunar Orbiter…LOL!!! Okay not really an orbiter, but I can get very close-up detailed shots!
My backyard Observatory has made another pass over the Lunar Terrain, this time closing in on Tycho & Clavius (multiple impacts within the crater itself)!!!
I’m always looking for nights were I can improve on the resolution from the previous shots!
This week I will be posting some of my Sharpest images of the Lunar surface taken just this past Sunday evening from my backyard observatory in Dayton, Ohio!!!
Dodging Contrails and High Cirrus clouds…shooting in the clear spots.
Details:
Lunar Impact Crater Tycho & Clavius on 11-02-2014 @18:56.21 E.S.T.
QHY5IIL Camera, Prime @ F6.3, 10″ SCT scope
5.6 ms exposures/15 FPS Full res 1280×960 (3.7micron Pixels)
Best 65% of 400 frames Stacked in Registax 6.

Best Regards,
John Chumack
www.galacticimages.com

NGC-1973-75-77 Reflection Nebula Complex

NGC-1973, NGC-1975, NGC-1977 Reflection Nebula Complex,
Nicknamed the Running Man Nebula,
It is located ~ 1460 light years away in the Constellation of Orion.

The Cloud is complex as there is a Red Emission region directly behind the dominant Blue Reflection Nebula,
the Nebula is reflecting Light from these young hot blue stars.
The region is abound with gas & dust clouds…NGC1973-75-77 is located 30 arc-minutes north of M42/M43 The Great Orion Nebula
NGC-1973, NGC-1975, NGC-1977 are the designations given for the 3 main parts of the Reflection nebula.

I captured this image on 10-26-2014 from my observatories at JBSPO in Yellow Springs, Ohio.

Canon 6 D DSLR & Home-built 16″ F4.5 Newt scope,
ISO 3200, for a 32 minute exposure, 8 x 240 second subs)

Best Regards,
John Chumack
www.galacticimages.com

M42 & M43 The Great Orion Nebula Complex

M42 & M43 The Great Orion Nebula, an Awesome Stellar Nursery – Star Formation Region!  One of the most amazing objects to see through a telescope!  Who would like to explore this gaseous Cloud with me???
I pulled an all-nighter at my observatory using my Canon 6D DSLR attached to my 16″ scope ..and took lots of Data on many objects.
I’ll be processing images for weeks to come, but this one of M42/M43 in Orion was a two exposures stacked, one at 4 minutes for the outer regions and 1 at 30 seconds for the trapezium region.   ISO-3200, 10-26-2014 3:06am
and still working out my coma corrector configuration, also still a tad bit of vignette near corners with the large chip for this setup, but
I was amazed at what my new Unmodified Full Frame Canon 6D pulled out in less than 5 minutes through my Home-built 16″ Diameter F4.5 Fork Mounted Newt. Telescope. The camera seems to be more green blue sensitive than others, yet still able to record the red nebula regions well, and at higher ISO seems a lot cleaner (less noise) than previous DSLRs.
Although it did take me about 4 hours to carefully process it though!! Thanks to my winning the National Science Foundation/Discover Magazine/Astronomy Mag’s International Comet ISON Photo Contest, with the 1st place Award money I was able to buy this new camera a bit sooner than I had thought! ..Now I’m looking forward to many more quick and painless captures of the sky!Best Regards,
John Chumack
www.galacticimages.com

Ursa Minor – The Little Dipper

Ursae Minoris – The Little Bear, The Little Dipper

Ursa Minor is Latin for Little Bear, Ursa Minor is a constellation in the northern sky. The tail of the Little Bear may also be seen as the handle of a ladle, hence the name Little Dipper.

It was one of the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd century astronomer Ptolemy, and remains one of the 88 modern constellations. Ursa Minor is notable as the location of the north celestial pole, although this will change after some centuries due to the precession of the equinoxes.

Polaris, also known as the North Star is the brightest star in the constellation, Polaris is a yellow-white super-giant and brightest Cepheid variable star, ranging from apparent magnitude 1.97 to 2.00.

Beta Ursae Minoris is only slightly fainter, with its apparent magnitude of 2.08.  Also known as Kochab, it is an orange giant star, 16 degrees from Polaris. Kochab and magnitude 3 Gamma Ursae Minoris have been called the ‘guardians of the pole star’.

I have included an illustrated version to I.D. the Stars & magnitudes (brightness), using the Little Dipper as practice you can learn how to judge a Star’s magnitude in the night sky!

Interesting Fact :  Four stellar systems have been discovered to contain planets.

Photo Details:

Ursa Minor – The Little Dipper & Polaris

Canon 6D DSLR & 58mm Lens, F4.0, ISO 1250, CG-4 Tracking Mount, a 48 second exposure captured at John Bryan State Park in Yellow Springs, Ohio on 09-22-2014.

Best Regards,

John Chumack

www.galacticimages.com

M27 The Dumbell Nebula

M27 – A dying star
The Dumbbell Nebula (also known as Apple Core Nebula, Messier 27, M 27, or NGC-6853) is a planetary nebula in the constellation Vulpecula, at a distance of about 1,360 light years.

This object was the first planetary nebula to be discovered; by Charles Messier in 1764. At its brightness of visual magnitude 7.5 and its diameter of about 8 arc-minutes, it is easily visible in binoculars, and a popular observing target in amateur telescopes.

The nebula was formed when an evolved, red giant star ejected its outer envelope near the end of its lifetime. The expanding cloud of gas becomes visible once the hot core of the star, visible near the center, is exposed and the high-energy, ultraviolet light from the core ionizes the cloud.

Unmodified Canon 6D DSLR at the Prime Focus of my Home-Built 16 inch Diameter Newtonian Telescope.
ISO 3200, a single 90 second exposure, at my observatories in Yellow Springs, Ohio.

Best Regards,
John Chumack
www.galacticimages.com