Tag Archives: #ChumackObservatories

Andromeda & Triangulum

Andromeda & Triangulum

Andromeda & Triangulum Constellations with Spirals!  We are looking through all those Milky Way Stars to see our nearby sister Galaxies in the background.
The Milky Way’s Sister Galaxies M31 Andromeda Spiral Galaxy & M33 Spiral Galaxy in Triangulum, also visible are NGC752 Open Cluster, & M34 Open Cluster, on The far left edge in Cassiopeia are the Double Clusters & NGC-281 Pacman Nebula in Cassiopeia. Included is my Illustrated version to help you identify what is in the FOV.

Canon 6D DSLR & 47mm lens,F4.5, 20 minute exposure, Star Adventurer Tracking Mount.
Kenton, Oklahoma at the Okie-Tex Star Party on 09-26-2016.

Best Regards,
John Chumack
www.galacticimages.com

Comet Catalina

Comet Catalina c/2013 US10, A Long Exposure

Comet Catalina C/2013 US10 on 1-02-2016
Dust & Ion Tails Captured in this 144 minute Long exposure from my observatories in Yellow Springs, Ohio, Last Quarter Moonlight Present, but I used a CLS filter to help knock down the Moonlight a bit.
Baader Modified Canon Rebel Xsi DSLR Camera, 5.5inch diameter Newt. telescope, 2 hours & 24 minute exp., 48 x 3 minute subs, ISO 1600 Tracking on the Nucleus of Comet Catalina. 09:00 U.T. to 11:24 U.T. on 01-02-2016
Best Regards,
John Chumack
www.galacticimages.com

Orion Nebula

M42 & M43 The Great Orion Nebula Complex

While Waiting For the Comet to Rise above the trees, I was killing time nabbing a few Frames of The M42 & M43 Orion Nebula Complex..always fun to image & always lots of details easily visible in this stellar Nursery even in a small 5.5 inch diameter telescope! I grab this 35 minute, 7 x 5min subs. I could have rotated the Camera to included the Blue Running Man Nebula(off the top edge), but was already focused & orientated for Shooting the Double Tail of Comet Catalina that I was about to shoot on the Morning of 12-20-2015.
Best Regards,
John Chumack
www.galacticimages.com

M8 The Lagoon Emission Nebula

M8 The Lagoon Emission Nebula Complex in Sagittarius, located just above the spout of the Teapot, it is easily visible as a bright glowing patch of light to the human eye from a dark location, looks great in binoculars too!

M8 is approximately 5000 light years away, and roughly 130 light years across in the longer dimension. Composed primarily of hydrogen, much of it ionized (heated or energized) by radiation from the nearby superstar Herschel 36, M8 is known as an emission nebula or star-forming region, often called a stellar nursery.

There is an open star cluster, NGC 6530, of young hot, blue stars probably only a few million years old. In addition to these young stars, there are also many dark nebulae visible or “Bok” globules of condensing gas and dust on their way to becoming “proto-stars” and eventually full-fledged stars like those already formed nearby.
In this image that I captured Saturday night 09-05-2015 you can see
M8 The Lagoon Emission Nebula Complex in Sagittarius with open star cluster NGC 6530 in front of the Nebula, also a globular Star cluster, bottom left corner is NGC 6544, and upper left of center is a small blue wisp of Nebulosity called IC 4678 reflection nebula.  If you look near the brightest star on the Lagoon Nebula, you will see the tiny Hour Glass Nebula, so named for its distinctive shape.  The Hourglass Nebula has its shape because of matter propelled by Star Herschel 36, look for the tiny star next to the tiny Hour Glass.

5.5 inch F5 Newtonian Reflector Scope & modified Canon Rebel Xsi DSLR, ISO 1600, 72 minute exposure at my Observatories at JBSPO in Yellow Springs, Ohio.

Best Regards,
John Chumack
www.galacticimages.com

The Planet Saturn

Saturn on 07-10-2015

Saturn on 07-10-2015 from my backyard in Dayton, Ohio. Right now Saturn is about 857 Million miles from Earth, or 9.22 Au, or 1.28 light hours away.
After rain & clouds for months…Actually the worst Spring/Summer I can remember as far as lack of clear skies…plus with Wildfires in Canada making the sky really not clear, even when there are no obvious clouds, I did finally get a couple of hours of clear skies after the front moved through! I noticed the seeing was decent, so I decided to cranked up the power with a Televue 5x Barlow, with my old orange tube C8 Scope & Qhy5IIL CCD camera, LRGB, 3200 frames stacked in Registax 6.

It is not as clean as I would like, but considering our usual poor seeing in the Midwest, it has nice color, & now that we are past opposition you can see the Saturn’s shadow starting to fall on the rings at top left, so I will take it while hoping for another good stable clear night soon!
Best Regards,
John Chumack
www.galacticimages.com