Tag Archives: Galactic Images

The Bubble Nebula, Caldwell 11, Sharpless 162

The Bubble Nebula Complex in Cassiopeia

NGC7635 The Bubble Nebula

Certainly my best shot of the Bubble Nebula complex to date!
Lots of detail in this one!
It is an enormous bubble being blown into space by a super-hot massive star!
This was a 10 Hours of exposure through Astronomik 7nm & 6nm Narrow Band data Mapped out to RGB. Captured over 3 nights from my backyard observatory in Dayton. 6″ Celestron Newt.,Coma Corrector, & ZWO 174mm Cooled CMOS Camera, Nebulosity, Pixinsight, & Adobe CS.
NGC 7635, also called the Bubble Nebula, Sharpless 162, or Caldwell 11, is a H II region emission nebula in the constellation Cassiopeia, The “bubble” is created by the stellar wind from a massive hot, 8.7th magnitude young central star, SAO 20575.
The Bubble is located in front of the HII Emission Region. It is located about 7000 to 11000 light years from Earth.

Saturn & moon Enceladus

Saturn & moon Enceladus

Saturn is nearing Opposition, and is looking good all night long now…So go out and look it low in the South, Saturn is only ~ 21 degrees above my Southern Horizon in Dayton, Ohio, but still looks great in a telescope.

Here is another Shot this time Close-up of Saturn with the (11th magnitude Icy Geyser moon) Enceladus ,captured on 06-09-2017 from my backyard Observatory in Dayton, Ohio.

I used a Televue 5x Barlow & QHY5IIL Cmos Camera attached to my old orange tube C8, testing the magnification limits of my little 8 inch diameter scope.

The exposure times were longer than usual through RGB filters, as Saturn got very dim when magnifying that much with the 5x Barlow.  I can only do this on nights of decent stable seeing, but it was cool to see it fill my screen.

Not bad for being so low on the Horizon and for an object that is 1.275 billion km  or ~ 792 million miles away.

Saturn rises after dark in the South East each night, but is at its highest point in the South by about 2:00am …look for that bright Yellow Star due South.

I hope we get many more stable seeing nights during this Saturn Observing Season!

Best Regards,

John Chumack

www.galacticimages.com

NGC-4565 Edge on SPiral galxy

Caldwell 38 or NGC-4565 Edge on Spiral Galaxy

Caldwell 38 or NGC-4565 Edge on Spiral Galaxy, shining at magnitude 10.4,it is located at 30 to 50 million light years away in the direction of the constellation of Coma Berenices. Nick named the “Needle” Galaxy due its thin edge on profile. It was discovered by Sir William Herschel in 1785.

The central bulge of NGC-4565 is thought to have about 240 globular star clusters hovering around it, far more than our own Milky Way Galaxy.

The really cool thing is that if we were to back away from our own Milky Way galaxy and go about 50 million light years out and then look back we would look similar to this galaxy. The NGC4565 Galaxy is even more luminous that Andromeda, but is about 25 times more distant.

The smaller spiral galaxy to the upper left is NGC-4562, and there are several other little galaxies visible in the background as well.

NGC-4565 Certainly is one of my favorites to look at in my telescopes.

I captured this image from my backyard in the city of Dayton, Ohio with my Celestron 6 inch Newtonian Telescope, & ZWO ASI 174MM Cooled monochrome Cmos Camera with a 2 hour exposure.

Best Regards,

John Chumack

www.galacticimages.com

Andromeda & Triangulum

Andromeda & Triangulum

Andromeda & Triangulum Constellations with Spirals!  We are looking through all those Milky Way Stars to see our nearby sister Galaxies in the background.
The Milky Way’s Sister Galaxies M31 Andromeda Spiral Galaxy & M33 Spiral Galaxy in Triangulum, also visible are NGC752 Open Cluster, & M34 Open Cluster, on The far left edge in Cassiopeia are the Double Clusters & NGC-281 Pacman Nebula in Cassiopeia. Included is my Illustrated version to help you identify what is in the FOV.

Canon 6D DSLR & 47mm lens,F4.5, 20 minute exposure, Star Adventurer Tracking Mount.
Kenton, Oklahoma at the Okie-Tex Star Party on 09-26-2016.

Best Regards,
John Chumack
www.galacticimages.com

Ursa Minor – The Little Dipper

Ursae Minoris – The Little Bear, The Little Dipper

Ursa Minor is Latin for Little Bear, Ursa Minor is a constellation in the northern sky. The tail of the Little Bear may also be seen as the handle of a ladle, hence the name Little Dipper.

It was one of the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd century astronomer Ptolemy, and remains one of the 88 modern constellations. Ursa Minor is notable as the location of the north celestial pole, although this will change after some centuries due to the precession of the equinoxes.

Polaris, also known as the North Star is the brightest star in the constellation, Polaris is a yellow-white super-giant and brightest Cepheid variable star, ranging from apparent magnitude 1.97 to 2.00.

Beta Ursae Minoris is only slightly fainter, with its apparent magnitude of 2.08.  Also known as Kochab, it is an orange giant star, 16 degrees from Polaris. Kochab and magnitude 3 Gamma Ursae Minoris have been called the ‘guardians of the pole star’.

I have included an illustrated version to I.D. the Stars & magnitudes (brightness), using the Little Dipper as practice you can learn how to judge a Star’s magnitude in the night sky!

Interesting Fact :  Four stellar systems have been discovered to contain planets.

Photo Details:

Ursa Minor – The Little Dipper & Polaris

Canon 6D DSLR & 58mm Lens, F4.0, ISO 1250, CG-4 Tracking Mount, a 48 second exposure captured at John Bryan State Park in Yellow Springs, Ohio on 09-22-2014.

Best Regards,

John Chumack

www.galacticimages.com

The North American Nebula Complex

The North American Nebula Complex as it resembles the Continent of North America, this is one of the largest stellar Nurseries (Star Formation Regions) in the Northern Sky, visible to the unaided eye from a dark location, but looks much better in Binoculars! The Complex is about 1800 light years distance from Earth, and it spans ~ 50 light years across or ~300 trillion miles across.

Also visible in the image is the Pelican Nebula right, & the Bright Blue Star at the top right is Deneb or Alpha Cygni in the Constellation of Cygnus “The Northern Cross” or “The Swan”.

Another one of my telephoto only shots from Northern Michigan this past week, using just telephoto lenses on a CG-4 tracking mount. Baader Modified Canon Rebel Xsi DSLR, 75-300mm set to 180mm, F5.0, ISO 1600, 12 x 3 minute subs, total 36 minute exposure. 07-23-2014

Best Regards,
John Chumack
www.galacticimages.com

M8 The Lagoon Nebula Complex & M20 The Trifid Nebula

A wide field view of a great Nebula region near the center of our Galaxy!!!
M8 The Lagoon Emission Nebula Complex, this Great Nebula is visible to the unaided eye from a dark location,
but looks much better in binoculars or a small telescope.
The Lagoon Nebula M8 is a Massive & very active Stellar Nursery (Star Formation Region) with embedded bright Star Cluster NGC-6523

The Lagoon is Located 5,000 light years from Earth in the constellation of Sagittarius in the direction of the Center of the Milky Way.
The Glowing Gas & Dust cloud spans well over 60 light years across (348 trillion miles)

Above M8 The Lagoon is the beautiful Trifid Emission/Blue Reflection Nebula known as M20, along with Open Star Cluster M21, and below the Lagoon Nebula is 7.5 magnitude NGC-6544 Globular Star Cluster.

To the left edge of the Lagoon you will see several fainter Blue Reflection Nebulae IC-4681, IC1275,IC-4685, and NGC-6559.

I captured this image with my modified Canon Rebel Xsi DSLR & Canon 200mm lens from the Vacation Cabin in Northern, Michigan on 07-21-2014!
This  is a 21 minute exposure (7 x 3 minutes subs), ISO 1600, F5.0, tracking on a CG-4 mount.

Best Regards,
John Chumack
www.galacticimages.com

Incredibly Starry Alaskan Skies & Faint Photographic Aurora

Incredibly Starry Alaskan Skies & Faint Photographic Aurora
M31 Andromeda bottom left, middle left is the Double Star Cluster in Perseus.
Diagonally across the frame is our Milky Way Galaxy. While a Satellite cuts through the center of the FOV.

Even when you can’t see Aurora with your eye, your camera can capture the subtle beauty of the elusive  Aurora Borealis!!!

At the Bottom is the Faint Arch Aurora Borealis & across the top are patches of faint green Aurora (Excited Oxygen Molecules).
Far right is the bright Star Vega!

Details:
Aurora Borealis In Alaska on 03-28-2014
Canon 5D Mark II DSLR & Canon 24mm lens, F2.0, ISO 6400
A single 30 second exposure with Camera on a tripod.

Best Regards,
John Chumack
www.galacticimages.com

Alaska’s Amazing Scenery & Aurora!!

Soooooo Missing Alaska right now!!!…And still processing the 8,000+ Aurora images I captured up there! Here is another nice one approaching us just before it went crazy, on the night of 03-27-2014…this one was shot with A Canon 5D Mark II + 24mm F1.4lens set at F2.0, ISO 3200, for a 10 second exposure.
Best Regards,
John Chumack
www.galacticimages.com

Alaskan Star Trails & Aurora Borealis

Here is a Star Trail Time Lapse with Aurora Borealis taken during my Alaskan Aurora Tour/Workshop back in March of 2014.

This was taken at Chena Hot Springs, 60 miles outside of Fairbanks, AK.  The Image is approximately 13 minutes of Star Trails and Aurora Borealis, the Aurora started out dim, but then got so bright it lit up the snow!!!

Taken March 25, 2014 with a Canon 5D Mark II DSLR, Canon L Series 24mm F1.4 lens, set to F2.0, ISO 6400, for 10 second exposures.

Join us on our Alaskan Aurora Photo Tour/Workshop in 2015. The First tour date is Sold Out, but the second tour date still has a few spots available… http://www.galacticimages.com/galactic_trips.html

Best Regards,

John Chumack

www.galacticimages.com